ZERO WASTE WEEK 6th- 10th SEPTEMBER…

Zero Waste Week takes place between the 6th-10th September.

It started originally by Rachelle Strauss, following the Bostcastle flood 2004. Now reaching a global following with millions of people, action groups, businesses and organisations taking part.

Zero Waste week was founded by Rachelle Strauss in 2008 and began as a National UK Campaign.Campaigns last a week and take place annually during the first full week in September.

The campaign runs predominantly on social media and the website ZeroWasteWeek to reach a community of like-minded people who want to reduce residential or commercial waste, reuse materials and recycle as much as possible. The aim of the campaign is to help householders, businesses, schools and community groups increase recycling, reduce landfill waste and participate in the circular economy – in alignment with European recommendations and Directives.

Zero Waste Week was created a non-commercial grass roots campaign to demonstrate means and methods to reduce waste, foster community support and bring awareness to the increasing problem of environmental waste and pollution. The term ‘Zero Waste Week’ is now used by many organisations, groups and individuals not connected to the original campaign. Local and national events are held annually where participants and communities make a concerted effort to demonstrate that household, business and industrial waste can be eliminated or reduced.

The roots of the Zero Waste Week campaign emerged from the Boscastle flood of 2004. The Strauss family were caught in the village of Boscastle when a freak rain storm swelled 2 rivers meeting an incoming tide at the estuary. The ensuing deluge washed away many of the historic buildings and shops, along with several cars and possessions. The tragic event inspired Rachelle Strauss to set-up the Gloucestershire The Freecycle Network, a non-profit worldwide charitable organisation gifting reusable goods in order to divert from the landfill.

The freak weather event was her wake up call to the real possibility that man made climate change may have contributed to the Boscastle flood. During the following years the Strauss Family developed their interests in sustainable living as a personal challenge to lessen their environmental impact. In 2008 Rachelle Strauss setup her website and blog MyZeroWaste.com and in September 2008 she launched the first Zero Waste Week online campaign to reduce, reuse and recycle as an public participatory Zero Waste week event with this official announcement.

The campaign continued to be held on the the Zero Waste Website up until Zero Waste Week September 2013. In 2018 the campaign reached its ten year milestone. and grown an international following of over 56 million participants worldwide.

The term Zero Waste Week has been gradually adopted by other campaigns and organisations to run a week of events and activities to highlight the need to reduce waste materials and foster recycling methods and reuse. The themes and topics usually correspond with the original concepts to reduce, reuse and recycle waste materials, often with focus on specific current sustainability issues, such as reducing the use of plastics and food waste. Find out who is on the list on the Zero Waste Week website.

Source: Zero Waste Week

WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY 5th JUNE, 2021…

World Environment Day is taking place on 5th June, 2021.

From 4-5 June 2021, the World Environment Day website will broadcast the Virtual Launch Gala welcoming the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration comprising of inspiring messages from world leaders, activists, celebrities, and musical performances as well as Pakistan’s host country programme. The page will be updated as each event takes place with videos and information.

Join the conversation online on all social platforms using the hashtag #GenerationRestoration and #WorldEnvironmentDay. All times are listed in Eastern African Time, which is (GMT+3).

Watch the broadcast on this page or here (starting June 4, 16:00 EAT)

Moderated by Saima Mohsin, international TV journalist and correspondent.

REIMAGINE. RECREATE. RESTORE.

This is our moment.

We cannot turn back time. But we can grow trees, green our cities, rewild our gardens, change our diets and clean up rivers and coasts. We are the generation that can make peace with nature.

Let’s get active, not anxious. Let’s be bold, not timid. 

Join #GenerationRestoration

5 WAYS TO REDUCE PLASTIC FOR PLASTIC FREE JULY from A ZERO WASTE LIFE BLOG…

I found this great article on 5 ways to reduce plastic during July on the Creative Impact site.

Charlotte Watkivs co-runs the blog A Zero Waste Life and the not-for-profit Zero Waste in the Community. She has sent virtually no rubbish to landfill in over three years. This journey started when Charlotte and her friend Anna took on a New Years Resolution to live zero waste for a year. This was achieved by reducing their need for single-use items, repurposing and reusing old items, recycling what can’t be reused, and rotting organic waste. They now share what they’ve learnt in workshops and talks.

Plastic Free July is a global movement that helps millions of people be part of the solution to plastic pollution – so we can have cleaner streets, oceans, and beautiful communities. Will you be part of Plastic Free July by choosing to refuse single-use plastics? These tips should help get you started and encourage you to join Plastic Free July. Once you get into a rhythm with it, it’s really quite addictive!

Quick tips for Plastic Free July

  1. Pick one ‘eco’ switch and do it really well. It’s far better to focus on acing one habit than it is to try and change too many things.
  2. Move your bin! A really simple one, but each time you come to throw something away, you’ll have a mini panic wondering where your bin is, then when you remember, you can work out the best way to reuse or recycle it and even plan if you can buy something in less packaging next time.
  3. Create a Zero Waste kit. We’re all so used to the idea that to start a new hobby or change our lifestyles, we have to buy lots of things. That goes against the idea of Zero Waste, as a lot of resources are needed to make all of these items. Collect reusable items you’ve already got, like a bag, water bottle, fork and so on.
  4. Once you’ve created your Zero Waste Kit, remember to take it out with you! It’s great if you can get into the habit of always having reusable items on hand and remembering to use them and not items made from single-use plastics.
  5. Talk to others about what you’re doing. Share your struggles and successes so you can inspire and learn from others. If you’re struggling to get motivated, join some social media groups. You’ll get inspired to take your next steps and may even find an accountability buddy.

The Creative Impact Group are a collective of individuals using their creative talent to positively impact others and the planet.

The term creatives includes Instagrammers, content creators photographer, writers, coaches, fitness and wellbeing instructors, professionals. People looking to educate, inspire and motivate their audiences to become the best version of themselves.