LUCKY INCENSE AS A FENG SHUI DECORATION FOR YOUR HOME…

AFTERNOON TEA 4 TWO - FOOD & LIFESTYLE BLOG...

I was sent this beautiful ‘Lucky Cow Waterfall Backflow Cone Incense Burner Incense Decoration‘ for my home from ‘Lucky Incense‘, to write a review on it.

The backflow incense burner is made of ceramic material and measures 13.6 x 11cm and is 5.2cm high and costs £23.

The stone mills incense waterfall implies that every dog has his day and if you put it in your home it can help to make money and make your home full of popularity. It is conductive of bringing good luck to your home.

The smoke of the back flowing incense flows along the stone mill like you can see from the images, it flows down slowly looking like a pretty paining. Aside from the luck it may send you its just such a lovely peace to have around and looks amazing when lit.

It’s extremely ornamental and would look…

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5 GREAT REASONS TO BUY FAIR TRADE COFFEE…

1.When you choose Fairtrade coffee, not only can farmers build a better quality of life for their families and communities, they can invest in growing better quality beans too.

2. Fairtrade coffee farmers invest at least 25 percent of their Fairtrade premium in improving productivity and quality.

3, Choose Fairtrade coffee and you’re also supporting farmers to fight the challenges they may face. These include the effects of a changing climate, low and unpredictable incomes and in some coffee-growing communities, there may not be enough food available for three to four months a year.

4. Being part of Fairtrade has meant better knowledge about protecting the local environment and the chance to plant other crops and buy livestock to put more food on the table.

5. Around 125 million people worldwide depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Coffee is the most valuable and widely traded tropical agricultural product and 25 million smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee. But many of them fail to earn a reliable living from coffee.

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SNUGGLE UP WITH YOUR OWN GRANNY BLANKET…

With the sun well and truly popping its head out in the UK this week it makes us all want to chill in the sunshine but once that sun goes behind a cloud or disappears later in the day the chill can really be felt. After all it is still only March but I love being outside so I made myself a granny blanket during the winter ready for this day to arrive.

I wrote a post on this on Afternoon Tea4Two last year and wrote what inspired me to give it a go. “The knitted blanket is a glorious expression of any grandmother’s soul; it is the colours of her dreams woven in delicate and loving hands. She would sit in that old rocking chair, hands moving, brain at peace, and from those delicate fingers would come the blankets.” Reading that paragraph in a book I was reading really inspired me to give it a go.

I decided right from casting on the first stitch that I would knit six squares one after the other in different colours rather than individual squares. All my wool was double knitting and I chose a pair of needles in size 7 for a 9” square using garter stitch ( knitting every row) and casting on 35 stitches. I’m so pleased with the result I’m knitting another in black ( as I had lots of this wool). I then made lots of tassels with other bits of wool I still had.

Of course you don’t have to knit this blanket, you can also crochet it and there are lots of patterns you can download on Pinterest like this one below on Just B Crafty on Pinterest.

Knitting or crocheting is such a lovely way to pass some time by and you don’t need to be an expert to copy some of these patterns. I assure you I am not. Wool is accessible online so you have no need to wait until all the shops are open.

Do you know where granny blankets originated from? Well, Interweave wrote that a pattern for what is now called crochet granny square first appeared in print in 1897! Weldon’s Practical Needlework featured a pattern for the “Patchwork Square”, suggesting it is a good way to use up leftover yarn, and the patches can be sewed together into a blanket.

The Woman’s Day Book of Granny Squares (Fawcett, 1975), a collection of granny-based designs, notes that grannies have been around for “as long as anyone can remember… Making colorful afghans by joining small squares,” the book’s introduction states, “is one of the most traditional and American forms of crochet.” So strongly was this style of crochet identified with the United States that in Europe, say the book’s editors, it was called American crochet. They attribute the popularity of grannies to their portability, simplicity, and the fact that they’re excellent vehicles for using up scraps of yarn and for experimenting with color combinations.

And, they were called granny squares because granny’s crocheted them.