HOW TO GET THROUGH THE WINTER LIKE THE DANES DO…

How to stay happy like the Danes during winter lockdown is an article I read in The Times.

Apparently Denmark is grappled with coronavirus rates higher than most of its Nordic neighbours and is also now on the UK quarantine list and the economy is facing its biggest contraction since the Second Word War with dark and dreary winter well on its way. But this doesn’t bother the Danes, they are still happy.

Where else in the world would choose this moment to open a Happiness Museum, devoted to the subject for which the Danes are most famous? And not only that, but manage to attract up to 70 smiling visitors a day, even with the dearth of tourists on Copenhagen’s streets.

The Telegraph wrote that one study even found that the closer a country is in distance to Denmark, the happier its people are likely to be! So are Danes just born happy, or do they know something we don’t? Well, the Danes have better work-life balance than anywhere else in the world, with only 2 per cent regularly working long hours (compared to an average figure of 13 per cent for other countries). All employees are entitled to a minimum of five weeks paid holiday a year, and when Danes are at work, they often have flexible working environments.

The Danes also love their sweets, especially baking and eating cakes, cookies, and pastries. Anything home-cooked is much more hygge than something store-bought. Hygge drinks are best served warm. Tea, hot chocolate, and mulled wine all have a high hygge factor. Especially on a cold winter night.

Culture Trip wrote that from November until the end of February, Denmark’s nickname is Mordor. Yes, you got that right, J.R.R. Tolkien’s fictional world of Middle-earth. Truth is that some days you can’t really tell which is one is the worst but don’t despair because these tips will help you to survive the winter like a local. Getting through the Danish winter is a tough challenge even for locals. With more than four months of low temperatures often sinking below zero, sunless weeks with the morning light coming up at around 8 a.m. and lasting until 4 p.m. and heavy rain or snow, Covid-19 and lockdowns, you’ll need more than just Vitamin D to survive the wintertime.

So, don your baggy scarves, think of indoor activities and crafts you can do, bake, bake and bake some more (make sure you do the steps after baking) and get your magazines and books at the ready, and a cosy throw. Wrap yourself up into a little cocoon and enjoy winter no matter what.

7 IMAGES THAT SHOW HOW YOU CAN CREATE A COSY HOME THIS AUTUMN…

Images speak a million words and so my next post is going to be all about creating a cosy home this Autumn.

A simple glass table showing lots of interesting books to sit down, cosy up and enjoy.
A perfect spot to simply sit, relax and read your heart out.
If it’s not cold enough for a real fire simply fill it with candles to create a cosy atmosphere.
You can make your bathroom just as cosy as your lounge to chill in.
These beautiful bedroom image just makes me want to just dive into that bed.
If you get the lighting right in your kitchen it can create another cosy area.
Conservatories aren’t just for summer, this one is all set up for the Autumn.

NATURAL HEALING THE HYGGE WAY…

Simple steps to balance your mind, body and soul can easily be achieved and help heal the natural way.

All Hygge followers love to wear cosy socks and warm winter boots but you still have to look after your feet.

Vinegar foot soak is ideal for dry soles and toes with it’s antibacterial properties, Apple cider and vinegar is another good one to try.

Just add two parts warm water for every one part vinegar to a foot bath and soak your feet for 10-20 minutes. Repeat as often as you feel like it to keep your feet soft.